Help us bring our documentary to the big screen!

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“The Devil’s Road: A Baja Documentary”

FOLLOWING THE LANDMARK ROUTE TAKEN BY TWO RENOWNED NATURALISTS OVER A HUNDRED YEARS PRIOR, A GROUP OF PRESENT-DAY ADVENTURERS EMBARK ON AN EXPEDITION TO DOCUMENT THE BEAUTIFUL AND UNFORGIVING LANDSCAPE OF TODAY’S BAJA CALIFORNIA.

The Devil’s Road is very multifaceted. It is part historical documentary, a re-telling of Baja’s natural history, highlighting the significant work of Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman (two of Baja’s foremost naturalists) in this region, in a time when very little was known about Baja. We will be documenting 110-plus years of change on the peninsula, looking at its environmental, economic, and cultural implications. The film is also part journey through several crew members’ family history, as three of the frontrunners of the film are directly related to Edward A. Goldman.

At its core, The Devil’s Road is an adventure film and travel narrative that aims to entertain viewers, while also being educational, raising awareness about, and paying homage to a uniquely beautiful and inspiring place that is quickly becoming tarnished by the human footprint.

Please contribute to our Indiegogo campaign and help us meet our goal
of bringing this film to the big screen.

We can’t do it without your help…

C O N T R I B U T E  T O D A Y 

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A Baja Documentary: “The Devil’s Road”

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3,000 MILES | 110 YEARS | 3 GENERATIONS | 1 EPIC ADVENTURE

FOLLOWING THE LANDMARK ROUTE TAKEN BY TWO RENOWNED NATURALISTS OVER A HUNDRED YEARS PRIOR, A GROUP OF PRESENT-DAY ADVENTURERS EMBARK ON AN EXPEDITION TO DOCUMENT THE BEAUTIFUL AND UNFORGIVING LANDSCAPE OF TODAY’S BAJA CALIFORNIA.

In 1905, two American naturalists set out on horseback across the remote deserts of Baja California, Mexico. Their 2,000-mile expedition was the first of its kind to span the entire peninsula and complete a comprehensive survey of Baja’s flora and fauna. Zig-zagging from coast to coast across the desolate interior, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman described plants and animals unknown to science.

One hundred years later, Goldman’s descendants return to Baja to retrace the steps of this landmark expedition on motorcycles, and document the changing nature of this strange and beautiful landscape.


The Devil’s Road
is very multifaceted. It is part historical documentary, a re-telling of Baja’s natural history, highlighting the significant work both Nelson and Goldman did in this region, in a time when very little was known about Baja. We will be documenting 110-plus years of change on the peninsula, looking at its environmental, economic, and cultural implications. The film is also part journey through several crew members’ family history, as three of the frontrunners of the film are directly related to Edward A. Goldman.

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At its core, The Devil’s Road is an adventure film and travel narrative that aims to entertain viewers, while also being educational, raising awareness about, and paying homage to a uniquely beautiful and inspiring place that is quickly becoming tarnished by the human footprint.

It is our goal to incite the crew’s passion about Baja in viewers, create excitement about the film’s message and its content, and produce a visually stunning film. We hope the film will resonate within viewers, and spark a desire to preserve Baja for future generations.

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We can’t make the film without the help of contributors, sponsors, and supporters. Contributors will play a key role in sharing the film’s message and joining the conversation our film establishes. We want nothing more than to stir in viewers the crew’s same passion and regard for Baja and to make a difference in its future.

Help us meet our goal and contribute, follow, “like,”
sponsor, or share today!

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Letter from the Associate Producer

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Dear family, friends, and fellow creatives:

I’m writing today to tell you all about my newest venture, and to gain your support.

For the last year I have been involved in an incredible project: producing a feature-length documentary film about Baja called “The Devil’s Road” as associate producer and marketing manager for Broken Wagon Films, LLC.

For those of you who know me well, Baja is near and dear to my heart. This is for many reasons but for the sake of brevity, I won’t name them all. I’ve been traveling to Baja since I was only a year old and seen many changes over the decades–some good, some heartbreaking. However, my roots in this place go much deeper than the dozens of visits throughout my life. My great, great-granduncle, Edward A. Goldman, was one of Baja’s foremost naturalists. He and colleague Edward W. Nelson, under the employ of the US Biological Survey and later the Smithsonian Institution, spent a year in Baja (and a total of 14 in Mexico) making some of the most significant contributions to science of any other researchers to this date. A number of plants and animal species are named after him, most previously unknown to science.

This film is multi-faceted: it’s part historical documentary, part adventure film aimed to entertain viewers, and at it’s core it is a call to preserve one of the world’s lesser known, beautifully unique, and biologically significant regions.

Our preliminary expedition is complete. Our producer (father and extreme adventurer Todd), director (brother and filmmaker extraordinaire JT), and scientific director (naturalist and biology professor Greg Meyer) spent weeks exploring and documenting four islands (off both the Sea of Cortez and Pacific coasts) that Nelson and Goldman visited in 1905 and 1906. We were all fascinated by the changes that have occurred in the last 110-plus years.

The team also spent some time at the Smithsonian Institution sifting through and scanning most of the photographs, documents, and other treasures found in the archives that belonged to Nelson and Goldman. This is an important historical aspect of the film, as Nelson and Goldman had close ties to president Theodore Roosevelt, John Muir, and other historical and scientific figures.

Today is a big day. It marks the launch of our Indiegogo campaign aiming to garner the support of viewers pre-production. Our main expedition will take place in March of 2017, but we can’t do it without your help.

I urge you all to take a look at the backstory behind this film at www.brokenwagonfilms.com.

Please visit our campaign page, and follow our journey on Instagram (@brokenwagonfilms), Twitter (@brokenwagonflms), and on Facebook to be a part of this adventure. Feel free to share with friends and others who may be interested in the film’s purpose and message.

Sincerest thanks,

Bri Bruce
(& the BWF Crew)
Associate Producer | Marketing Manager

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Journey Down The Devil’s Road (Broken Wagon Films)

3,000 MILES  |  110 YEARS  |  3 GENERATIONS  |  1 EPIC ADVENTURE

In 1905, two American naturalists set out on horseback across the remote deserts of Baja FullSizeRenderCalifornia, Mexico. Their 2,000-mile expedition was the first of its kind to span the entire peninsula and complete a comprehensive survey of Baja’s flora and fauna. Zig-zagging from coast to coast across the desolate interior, Edward William Nelson and Edward Alphonso Goldman described plants and animals unknown to science.

One hundred years later, Goldman’s descendents return to Baja to retrace the steps of this landmark expedition on motorcycles, and document the changing nature of this strange and beautiful landscape.

Meet the Crew  |  Read the Blog  |  Support the Project

 

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• • • • •

FEATURED: Ian Probert’s “Dangerous: An Intimate Journey Into the Heart of Boxing”

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DANGEROUS: AN INTIMATE JOURNEY INTO THE HEART OF BOXING
Ian Probert

A quarter of a century ago journalist and author Ian Probert decided never to write about boxing again. His decision was prompted by the injuries sustained by boxer Michael Watson during his world title fight with Chris Eubank. Now, in common with so many fighters, Probert is making an inevitable comeback. Dangerous sees Probert return to the scene of an obsession that has gripped him from childhood.

Clinical depression caused by death of his abusive father prompts Probert to retrace his steps in boxing. During an emotional eight-month journey Probert reconnects with boxing figures from his past and in doing so draws unexpected solace from a series of remarkable encounters. In the course of numerous meetings with a number of leading figures in the fight game, including Herol Graham, Steve Collins, Michael Watson, Ambrose Mendy, Frank Buglioni and Glenn McCmichael-watsonrory among others, Probert takes a look at how lives have changed, developed and even unravelled during the time he has been away from the sport.

From an illuminating and honest encounter with transgender fight manager Kellie Maloney to an emotional reunion with Watson himself, Probert discovers just how much the sport has changed during his absence. The end result is one of the most fascinating and unusual books ever to have been written about boxing.

 

• • • • •

It was 23 years ago when I last saw him. His eyes were closed and an oxygen mask was strapped to his mouth. His magnificent muscular torso was a tangle of tubes and sensors. He lay on the bed like a sleeping baby. The slightest of frowns pinched his forehead as if he were dreaming the longest dream: a dream that would last for a biblical 40 days and 40 nights before he would awaken to discover that his life had been ripped apart. That he could never again be the person that he used to be.

In a windswept hotel on the outskirts of Essex I sit at the rear of a vast banqueting hall and wait to see his face once more. I’m wearing the suit that I wore at my wedding and for the last three funerals that I attended. You could say that I’m not a suit person. It hangs loose on my body on account of the large amount of weight I’ve lost in the past couple of years.

‘You’ve put some pounds on,’ says a cor blimey voice, ‘You used to be a skinny fella.’

The voice takes a seat across from me at the table and I recognise its source. It’s also been more than two decades since I last saw him and his hair has waved goodbye – although I’m not one to talk – and he’s something like twice the size that he used to be.

‘You look like you’ve lost weight,’ I lie.

The other man caresses his beer gut and stares at the floor. ‘Yeah… I’ve been working out,’ he says without a trace of irony.

The stranger from my past withdraws to the bar leaving me alone at the dinner table to scrutinise other faces. In the far distance an ex-boxer named Nigel Benn is charging £20 a shot to be photographed with time-ravaged fans. The former world champion looks trim and wears a stylish striped jacket that would probably look ridiculous on anybody else. He grins earnestly and waves a weary fist at the camera. The middle- aged car salesman standing next to him follows his lead for posterity.

On the table closest to me I spot Alan Minter in a dickie bow. A lifetime ago I’d been a 17-year-old waiter serving wine at an event not unlike this one to a bashed-up Minter, who had just lost his undisputed world middleweight title. Back then he was one of the most famous people I’d ever met and I’d been in awe of him. Total awe. But now it’s only sorrow. His position at the outskirts of the hall – almost as remote and desolate as my own location – serves as a barometer for just how many people have forgotten his achievements. He’s at the back of the queue now and others have moved forward to take his place.

The speeches begin. On a long table at the front of the hall a smiling Nigel Benn is surrounded by other refugees from days gone by. A retired boxer named Rod Douglas sits close to another ex-fighter named Herol Graham, the man whose punches put an end to Douglas’ career. The two seem unaware of one another’s presence and I wonder if this is no accident. To Graham’s right is former world featherweight champion Colin McMillan and an assortment of other former prizefighters’ whose blurred features remain hidden in the shadows.

But I’m not here to see these people. Although they all in one way or another belong to my past I’m here to see only one person. I know he’s coming because the organiser of this tribute to Nigel Benn tipped me off before generously inviting me along. Everybody else seems to know he’s coming, too. It has to be the worst kept secret since someone let it slip that smoking is bad for you.

A whisper from the table, ‘Michael’s here.’ And suddenly I can stand it no longer. I climb to my feet and quietly exit the hall. Standing listlessly at the foot of a smartly decorated staircase are two disinterested looking bouncers. I ask them if they’ve seen Michael and they gesture towards a small corridor to the left of the staircase.

I find myself standing outside a disabled toilet. I try the handle. It’s locked. But just as I’m leaving, the door swings open and a large middle-aged black man with glasses and greying temples appears. We look at each other for a long time and disjointed words tumble from my lips, ‘Michael… It’s so nice to see you.’ It’s all I can think of saying. My voice is trembling and already I’m weak with emotion.

Broken Wagon Films presents “The Devil’s Road”

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The Starling’s Song

Bhaswati Ghosh

ss_frontcover1The Starling’s Song

B.L. Bruce

Black Swift Press

Available on: Amazon.com

Review by Bhaswati Ghosh

For those of us who live it every day, urban life can be unforgiving in its demands. Yet, there are release buttons that can help us slow down and turn towards the natural world and its rhythms. This movement isn’t as much a result of curiosity as it is of a desperate seeking — whether to find the missing pieces of the jigsaw of modern living or to simply let go of the puzzle altogether. The Starling’s Song, a recent poetry collection,  constructs a fine floating bridge to negotiate that distance — between nature’s tranquility and human restiveness. B.L. Bruce makes us walk on that now-steady, now-wobbly bridge with Feel, her very first of the three dozen or so poems in this chapbook.

Were you here I’d point out/the coyote’s tracks through the…

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